Bank Holiday weekend set to sizzle as Brits bask in scorching sunshine

Britain has been enjoying incredible weather recently with temperatures nearly creeping over 20C in recent days.

With Bank Holiday on the horizon thoughts are turning to barbecues and sunshine soaked beer gardens.

The good news is that the UK Bank Holiday is set to be a scorcher with temperatures sizzling in the mid-teens.

After a cold spell at the start of the week the heat should start to slowly build as we head towards the weekend.

South-eastern parts of England could well see highs of 15C on Bank Holiday Monday, while Kent and Southampton should see warm conditions of 14C.

The north west could also bask on 14C, including Stoke and Birmingham, on the same day, according to the Daily Express.

Brian Gaze, a forecaster at Weather Outlook, said next week could start to "feel quite warm" at May approaches.

He said: "Close to average temperatures are forecast when taken over the period as a whole and in the drier spells it feels quite warm.

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"There are signals for a rather unsettled start to be replaced by a drier spell which may last until the final week of the month.

The BBC's long-range forecast also suggests from May 3 to Sunday, May 9 high pressure could push sub-tropical heat towards the UK.

The forecast said: "April looks like it will end on a more unsettled note with scattered showers and light winds expected before drier weather develops in early May.

"As May begins our weather will continue to be influenced by a large area of high pressure, known as a sub-tropical high.

"As we head into the warmer months of the year, this high will become stronger and larger and tend to be centred near the Azores to the west of Spain and Portugal.

"This year we have unusually warm sea surface temperatures in the Atlantic which have been helping to build this high earlier than normal.

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