BBC Weather: Heavy weather front causes severe delays to Eunice repairs

Storm Eunice: BBC Weather warns of further windy conditions

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Darren Bett appeared on BBC Breakfast and warned the UK was “not out of the woods yet” as wintry showers bring snow to the north with the south of the UK seeing strong winds and heavy rain in some parts. Mr Bett explained a new weather front was moving in from the Atlantic with heavy showers expected across most of England. He added while winds will not be as strong as the 90mph+ seen on Friday, winds are expected to be around 60-70mph which may disrupt the clean up of Storm Eunice.

Speaking on BBC Breakfast, Mr Bett said things have calmed down but stressed warnings were still in place from the Met Office.

He said: “Well the storm swept away and it’s not as windy as it was but we’re not quite out of the woods just yet.

“Because there is some more wet and windy weather at times, it’s not going to be as bad as it was yesterday by any means.

“There are some warnings, as you say, these are the lowest tier yellow warning so no Amber no red warnings like we had yesterday.”

Mr Bett then showed a list that displayed the highest winds recorded on Friday which was 122mph in the Isle of Wight – the highest on record.

He continued: “No wonder those planes were struggling at Heathrow and Gatwick, gusts of 70mph or more, it’s very extreme for this part of England…

“We’ve kept a few showers, wintry showers, going across Scotland, Northern Ireland and the northwest of England so we’ve got a few icy patches around this morning, what a chilly start.

“Many places starting dry, the showers will fade away, we’ve got some wet weather coming in from the Atlantic to Northern Ireland, a bit of snow over the hills.

Storm Eunice: Red weather warning as 90mph winds to hit UK

“That rain will chase its way eastwards across England and Wales, a bit wintry over the hills of Northern England, it moves through fairly quickly though because we’ve got some strong to gale force winds along the south of England and South Wales once again where it’s much milder.

“In Scotland, after a chilly start here temperatures will be four or five degrees at best, that wet weather that moves in moves away and temperatures will fall below freezing early in the night in eastern Scotland.

“But then rise later, we’ve got all this wet weather piling in from the Atlantic and turning to melt some of that snow as well.

“It’s going to be pretty mild by the end of the night temperatures in most places in double figures.”

Mr Bett then looked at a new weather front coming in from the east which will bring rain and strong winds in some areas.

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He added: “More weather fronts though on the scene…. a big set of weather fronts, low pressure this time, more towards Iceland really so we’re not going to get the strongest of the winds but it will be pretty windy.

“In between those two weather fronts are warm means it’s very mild, cold will push down from the northwest so we’ve got outbreaks of rain around on Sunday.

“The rain could turn heavy for a while in Northern Ireland, southern Scotland then push its way into northern parts of England and North Wales.”

Mr Bett explained winds could be gusting between 40 to 60mph on average on Sunday before stating it could “hamper” any of the cleanup efforts from Storm Eunice.

The Met Office issued a red weather warning for parts of Southern England following the arrival of Storm Eunice as winds of 100mph battered the UK.

The storm brought chaos across the country with reports of lorries being tipped over on the motorway and the O2 Arena seeing its roof torn to shreds.

In Somerset, a local church built in the mid-1800s also saw its spire blown off due to the winds.

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