UK weather forecast: New charts show ‘big snow event’ NEXT WEEK after brutal Arctic blast

BBC Weather: Amber warning issued ahead of snow

Heavy snow showers have smashed large parts of the UK in recent days and caused widespread disruption up and down the country. The coldest night of the year was recorded last night when the Met Office measured bone-chilling lows of -16.7C in the Scottish Highlands.

The UK is set for a further dumping of snow within the next few days after new weather charts showed a blanket of snow closing in on Britain.

But while forecasts show the snow will clear towards the end of the week, ominous charts produced by The Weather Outlook, show a heavy band of snow showers will descend in a north easterly direction across the UK on February 15.

A new map released shows large areas of the UK – including South East, the Midlands and the North West – are covered in white as milder-air triggers further snowfall.

In a post on Twitter, The Weather Outlook wrote: “GFS12z has milder air slowly pushing northeastward next Monday.

“Big snow event in places if it is correct. Certainly a possible outcome.”

A separate weather map produced by WXcharts predicts the extent of the snow storm, with up to 17inches (45cm) of snow expected in central areas of Scotland during the early hours on Monday February 15.

By 6am, a huge dumping of snow is also forecast further south, with up to 11inches (28cm) in the north of England, four inches (11cm) in Wales and one inch (3cm) across East Anglia.

Next Monday, temperatures are set to fall to lows of -7C in Scotland overnight with lows of -2C in the North and 0C in the South.

Strong winds will continue to push wintry showers in a north-westerly direction, with milder-air coming across the South West during the day.

The Met Office long-range forecast from Sunday, February 14, says: “It will remain cold or very cold with strong winds on Sunday but potentially turning milder over western areas.

“Outbreaks of rain and snow, potentially heavy for some southwestern areas are possible, whilst staying mostly dry and bright in central and southeastern areas.

“Further into this period, snow and wintry hazards are likely to continue which could affect mainly northern areas and eastern areas, especially over higher ground but not confined to.”

The imminent threat of snow is largely concentrated on eastern areas of the UK, with up to six inches (15cm) falling on coastal regions in the south east of England this week.

Cold-air from Russia will continue to engulf the UK with sub-zero temperatures across the whole of the UK forecast tonight.

WXCharts show the whole of the UK turning ice-blue with chilling lows of -12C forecast in Scotland.

Lows of -7C are also forecast for the north of England and -4C in the South.

Met Office forecaster Nicola Maxey said: “There’s still a risk of snow anywhere down the eastern side of the UK.

“We’re in these cold easterly winds.

“The cold air crosses from Russia and eastern Europe, crosses the sea, picks up some moisture then when it hits the land you see rain or because the air’s so cold you see snow.”

The Met Office currently has three weather warnings in place across the UK, including an amber alert for eastern parts of Scotland.

DON’T MISS

Cornish fishermen pushed into post-Brexit rebrand [INSIGHT]
Royal Family LIVE: Meghan Markle’s ‘self-help’ book blasted [LIVE]
UK snow forecast: Second Arctic blast to batter the WEST in days [FORECAST]

The amber alert is in place until 9pm tonight and predicts up to 10inches (25cm) of snow could fall across higher parts of the Central Belt.

Towards the end of the week, cold-air will push further south with an increased threat of snow in the southwest.

Met Office deputy chief Meteorologist Jason Kelly, said: “Later in the week there is a chance of more organised snow affecting some western and southwestern parts of the country as Atlantic frontal systems push into the cold air.

“There is a lot of uncertainty regarding which areas are may see snow, but for now, southwest England, south Wales and Northern Ireland look most prone”.

Source: Read Full Article